Agent G Omnibus Review

When it comes to terms that end in “punk” I have never been a huge fan. I enjoy the aesthetic of Steampunk, but can never get into the stories, and that Cyberpunk 2077 video game came out and all I really cared about was how much the Keanu Reeves character actually looked like the talented actor.

That being said, I originally picked up the first Agent G book because of the author, C. T. Phipps, without any real idea that the story was “cyberpunk.” Instead, I dove into what I saw as a mix of James Bond’s serious take on the world and the level of body-mod technology akin to Austin Powers’ “machine gun jubblies.”

The world building of these stories is great. Not only is there the prebuilt world that is everything we know about it as normal people, but on top of that is a layer of black ops computer warfare that includes clones and augmented cybernetic enemies. There’s technologies that can hack anything and technologies that combat those hacks, with every new technology being countered by something even more fierce and incredibly imaginative, all while people fight with the moral dilemmas associated with the ethics of cloning, editing histories, manipulating the masses, government take-overs, and the exercising of free-will.

The first book introduces us to this amazing world, slamming us into the backseat as we follow Agent G, a nameless member of a combat elite with more secrets in his past than even he is aware of. He is led to believe that his organization is fighting on the side of right, but as Biggs Darklighter would soon discover, joining the Empire has it’s costs. Along the way, he meets assassins of equally morally dubious standing and discovers that everyone’s labels for good and bad don’t mean anything if everyone is out to kill you.

Another great comparison to this series is Pinocchio. Mostly because these books are the journey of a man who thinks he can be nothing more than a machine for the company discovering the things that make him human.I won’t go into the follow up works included in this omnibus because the only thing you need to know is that the battle rages on. Not just the battle between the company and Agent G, but the battle inside Agent G’s head.

I have said this in previous reviews of Phipps’s work, he soars when he’s working on character development and having a mindless automaton assassin discovering moral quandaries on the level of “do I have a soul” is the best playground possible for C. T.’s skillset. We start with someone who is happy with his place in the world and not really questioning anything. He has his home and his relationships as well as an understanding that his life is programmed to be short and is only as valuable as his next target’s status. Then we move onto him discovering that the world isn’t as it seems and maybe he isn’t either. It is the kind of wedge under a character that’s small, but can lever us into a huge character arc. And Phipps delivers.5 out of 5 stars and I can’t wait to see what more comes into the world of Agent G.

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