Review: Lovecraft Country Episodes 7&8

Even though the finale just aired (and I have yet to see it), I’m going to take a moment and review episodes 7 and 8 (I Am. and Jig-a-Bobo). This has been a great month for my writing projects, but at the same time I have had to borrow writing time from other things (such as reviews) to get there.

Episode 7, “I Am.” was a fun piece that I’m sure a lot of people are going to claim wasn’t even remotely Lovecraftian. Perhaps I’m wrong and they will be singing its praises but I have yet to read other reviews that take the same opinion on these that I do. Episode 7 followed Hippolyta, George’s widow, after she discovers the correct mathematical equation to open the Orrery. When she does get it opened, she discovers a key and a set of coordinates and decides that whatever this thing is, it has to give her answers to her burning questions regarding George’s death and her family’s lies.

At the same time, Atticus and Letti are trying to figure out their next steps and accidentally walk in on Montrose and his boyfriend. The issue is the times and the way they dealt with homosexuality, and whatever we’ve built Atticus up as in our heads, he’s still an Army boy from the fifties with huge respect for his mama. When he discovers that his dad is gay, he doesn’t know how he can trust someone who’s lied to his mother for years as well as struggles with the fact that his dad is gay.

In true “manly” fashion, Atticus decides to ignore it and focuses on the problem at hand until he and Letti realize that Hippolyta might have gotten herself into trouble.

Hippolyta is a resourceful gal, and she discovers and activates a sort of interstellar telescope that opens a portal through time and space (possibly multiple spaces). The security guards of the place show up, Atticus shows up, everybody is getting shot at, the machine gets hit by a stray bullet, security guards die, and then Hippolyta gets sucked into the portal.

She wakes up in a space cell. A prisoner (even though the aliens say she isn’t) of an alien or future race.

THIS IS LOVECRAFTIAN.

I had to put that in bold because a lot of people think that the term “Lovecraftian” means it has to fall directly in line with Lovecraft’s mythos. That isn’t my definition. Lovecraftian means otherworldy elements being interpreted as supernatural. Lovecraftian means aliens with unknown motives manipulating individuals in much the same way we like to laserbeam ants with a magnifying glass.

When Hippolyta fell through the portal and into time and space this group of aliens or whatever grabbed her and decided they wanted to examine and study her for their own unknown motives. They put a weird glass thing in her wrist and, in the only thing they do that makes mortal sense, they tell this woman who has had her freedoms held back by society that she can choose how free she wants to be. You can’t look at Hippolyta falling through time, getting snatched by an alien influence, and being experimented on and not think of the Yith or the Mi-Go. If you can, then I have to question your own understanding of the mythos. Are these aliens Yith? I doubt it, and they certainly don’t look like it, but then again, the Yith inhabit different species’ bodies as they die. This could be a future or past iteration of them from when they weren’t living in large insect-like crab-claw bodies. Do I believe that? No, but my point is in the idea. What is Lovecraftian? Alien influences and motives altering the course of human lives in unexplainable ways that seem supernatural. And that’s exactly what happens to Hippolyta.

In a lot of ways, this is exactly the same thing that happens with Ruby. On a lesser scale it is happening with Montrose. These people who are held down for whatever reasons are being given a level of freedom they have never experienced. For Hippolyta, she’s being told that she can decide her life, but she needs to understand who she is first.

Suddenly she’s thrust into a journey through different lives, times, and places, where she can examine herself and who she is. First she lives the dream, singing and dancing on the stage in Paris, then she’s learning how strong she is as she leads a band of women to fight every hateful man in history, and then she finds a place where George didn’t die and she tells him everything she’s needed to say in order to find herself again. And George, who I’ve always been a huge fan of, steps up and says, “Alright, I’ll be your sidekick. Let’s go.”

Probably the most romantic thing in this entire show.

Space adventures ensue, and Hippolyta says she’s ready to go home once she knows who she is, but we never see her step out of the portal again.

Back in our world and time, it turns out that Atticus got sucked into the portal too, and he gets spit back out, carrying a book with the same title of the show and runs away, leaving two dead guards and his cousin’s comic book, implicating Hippolyta in the guards’ deaths.

Episode 8, Jig-a-Bobo, is a mix of the aftermath of Hippolyta’s lack of return as well as a return to the more local situation. Immediately following the very-real-world death of Emmett Till, killed graphically for talking to a white woman while in her family’s grocery store. In the lore of Lovecraft Country, Emmett was also a friend of Hippolyta’s daughter, Diana (Dee).

Mikey and I had to take a moment when we discovered that this boy’s death was a real-world occurrence. This tragedy is heart-breaking and should be a story that people share for eternity to remind us of the horrors of hate as well as to keep Emmett Till’s name alive. Hate does nothing good for anyone and has no place in the hearts of man.

Understandably, Dee is upset. She needs to breathe, she needs to talk, and she still doesn’t know where her mother is. Atticus is still avoiding his father, and Letti is remorseful after her last conversation with her sister.

This episode does a lot to connect the dots between people’s stories, but the creepy crap is all happening to Dee.

In this episode we’ll see Ruby and Letti hear each other’s stories. Letti will understand that Ruby has been working with Christina. Ruby thinks Christina’s a good guy. Atticus will accept his father for who he is. We’ll also see that Atticus got sucked to the future in the last book and met a woman gave him a book, written by his own son, that recounts the upcoming events.

All of that is important and I care only in the grand scheme of the rest of the series, but can we get back to Dee? Thanks.

Dee gets cornered by zombie/wizard cop. Zombie/Wizard cop SPITS A LOOGIE ONTO HER HEAD and casts a spell. She wakes up later and my first thoughts are nothing good. I’m ready to kill this guy, but it turns out all he did was curse her with demons that’ll kill her, not any of the horrible stuff I expected him to do.

But I’m ahead of myself.

He corners her because everyone wants to know where Hippolyta disappeared to after those (white) security guards died.

Of course, Dee has no idea. For reasons that still don’t make any sense to me, he cursed her to be chased by creepy (like Pennywise) invisible demon things to stop her from… telling people? Warning people that he’s looking for her mother? I still don’t get it, but whatever.

Anyway, the rest of the episode is her getting hunted by these demons until one of them scratches her.

Atticus decides he’s going to use magic to make himself impossible to harm and recruits his dad to help. Letti tries the same thing, but recruits Christina to help. Christina knows that she needs to sacrifice Atticus to become immortal, so she’s decided she won’t save him, but she’ll gladly put a spell of “no harm” onto Letti and her unborn baby (totally preggers with Atticus’s kid).

Atticus and his father do the spell but Atticus doesn’t feel any different. He’s confused, but decides he’ll try to work another angle. Somewhere in this he explains to his dad about his future kid and the book.

During this, the cops have decided to storm Letti’s house. Everybody shows up. Bullets rain down on the place and Letti is totally bulletproof. She’s gonna kick ass, but then Atticus shows up and she goes running out to protect him from the bullets.

Except the spell Atticus and Montrose did worked! With an entirely different effect. It turns out that while they didn’t make Atticus into Superman like Letti was hoping for, he got his own protector in the form of a giant black shoggoth (the black shoggoth looks so much cooler than the pale ones).

Dee is scratched by the demon kids and dying. The episode ends with her sick, Letti impervious to harm, and Atticus all protected by monsters.

And now I want a monster shoggoth to eat all my enemies. Gonna have to rewind and rewatch that spell…

Mikey’s thoughts:

Little different this time folks. Every episode has historical audio files that play at certain moments. Sometimes it’s at a moment when all hope is lost or feels lost. But each time, realizing what is said and realizing that it really happened and these were said during a time where you could be killed because you looked at someone the wrong way. Each time, I feel like my heart is going to break. I just can’t believe the horror that lives in the hearts of man.

Also, this friggin show knows how to keep me on the edge of my seat. I want a Shoggoth.

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